Great power without insight: the illusion of scientific and technological advancement in terms of human thinking, values and practices

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dc.contributor.author Ogutu, Anthony O.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-18T09:10:16Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-18T09:10:16Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation The consolata institute of philosophy journal, vol 1 p75-84 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2072-7100
dc.identifier.uri http://repository.seku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/6230
dc.description.abstract Philosophy of technology deals with the nature of technology and its effects on human life and society. The increasing influence of modern technology on human existence has triggered a growing interest in a philosophical analysis of technology. Our concern in this paper consists in pointing out the basic shifts that have taken place in human thinking, values and practices in this technological era, bearing in mind that contemporary culture bears the imprint of technology. Among the most fundamental issues are two demarcation problems directly related to the definition of technology. The first concerns the distinction between technological (artificial) and natural objects. It involves the relation between man, nature and culture. The second pertains to the distinction between science and technology as types of knowledge. The science-technology relationship has become of central importance because of the widespread assumption that the distinguishing feature of modern technology, as compared to traditional forms of technology, is that it is science-based. Another much discussed issue is the autonomy of technology. It deals with the question of whether technology follows its own inevitable course of development, irrespective of its social, political, economic and cultural context. In his work Technology and the Character of Everydqy Life, Albert Borgmann pointed out that contemporary culture bears the imprint of technology. This is to say that technological development has and is tremendously continuing to transform society and the development process is determined by socio-cultural factors. Borgmann continues in his work based on what he calls deviceparadigm to say that technology is indeed a revolutionary factor in society, politics and culture. Although scientific and technological development has profoundly transformed and is continuing to transform, society, politics and culture, it has also produced adverse effects on human thinking, values and practises because knowledge seems divorced from values. In this paper, we shall discuss the great advances in society brought about by technological advancement. We shall also discuss the force, effects and the consequences of a nuclear age which we have created through an application of scientific and technological power and to see its moral implications as far as peace is concerned. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Consolata institute of philosophy en_US
dc.title Great power without insight: the illusion of scientific and technological advancement in terms of human thinking, values and practices en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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