High prevalence of Rickettsia Africae variants in Amblyomma Variegatum ticks from domestic mammals in rural Western Kenya: implications for human health

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dc.contributor.author Ng'ang'a, Zipporah W.
dc.contributor.author Maina, Alice N.
dc.contributor.author Jiang, Ju
dc.contributor.author Omulo, Sylvia A.
dc.contributor.author Cutler, Sally J.
dc.contributor.author Ade, Fredrick
dc.contributor.author Ogola, Eric
dc.contributor.author Feikin, Daniel R.
dc.contributor.author Njenga, M. Kariuki,
dc.contributor.author Cleaveland, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Mpoke, Solomon
dc.contributor.author Breiman, Robert F.
dc.contributor.author Knobel, Darryn L.
dc.contributor.author Richards, Allen L.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-03T06:24:18Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-03T06:24:18Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. October 2014, 14(10): 693-702 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/vbz.2014.1578
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/292
dc.description doi:10.1089/vbz.2014.1578. en_US
dc.description.abstract Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsioses are emerging human diseases caused by obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Rickettsia. Despite being important causes of systemic febrile illnesses in travelers returning from sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the reservoir hosts of these pathogens. We conducted surveys for rickettsiae in domestic animals and ticks in a rural setting in western Kenya. Of the 100 serum specimens tested from each species of domestic ruminant 43% of goats, 23% of sheep, and 1% of cattle had immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the SFG rickettsiae. None of these sera were positive for IgG against typhus group rickettsiae. We detected Rickettsia africae–genotype DNA in 92.6% of adult Amblyomma variegatum ticks collected from domestic ruminants, but found no evidence of the pathogen in blood specimens from cattle, goats, or sheep. Sequencing of a subset of 21 rickettsia-positive ticks revealed R. africae variants in 95.2% (20/21) of ticks tested. Our findings show a high prevalence of R. africae variants in A. variegatum ticks in western Kenya, which may represent a low disease risk for humans. This may provide a possible explanation for the lack of African tick-bite fever cases among febrile patients in Kenya. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. en_US
dc.subject Ambylomma variegatum en_US
dc.subject Rickettsia africae en_US
dc.subject Tick-borne spotted fever group en_US
dc.subject African tick-bite fever. en_US
dc.title High prevalence of Rickettsia Africae variants in Amblyomma Variegatum ticks from domestic mammals in rural Western Kenya: implications for human health en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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