Vector competence of Aedes aegypti in transmitting Chikungunya virus: effects and implications of extrinsic incubation temperature on dissemination and infection rates.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Mbaika, Sophiah
dc.contributor.author Lutomiah, Joel
dc.contributor.author Chepkorir, Edith
dc.contributor.author Mulwa, Francis
dc.contributor.author Khayeka-Wandabwa, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Tigoi, Caroline
dc.contributor.author Oyoo-Okoth, Elijah
dc.contributor.author Mutisya, James
dc.contributor.author Ng'ang'a, Zipporah W.
dc.contributor.author Sang, Rosemary
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-17T09:07:23Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-17T09:07:23Z
dc.date.issued 2016-06-29
dc.identifier.citation Virology Journal, en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4928303/pdf/12985_2016_Article_566.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://repository.seku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/3478
dc.description DOI: 10.1186/s12985-016-0566-7 en_US
dc.description.abstract Background Aedes aegypti is a competent arthropod vector of chikungunya virus (CHIKV). The rate at which the virus disseminate in the vector is limited by temperature of their environment which can be an important determinant of geographical and seasonal limits to transmission by the arthropods in the tropics. This study investigated the vector competence of Ae. aegypti for CHIKV at ambient temperature of 32 and 26 °C (Coastal and Western Kenya respectively) reared at Extrinsic Incubation Temperature (EIT) of 32 and 26 °C that resembles those in the two regions. Methods Ae. aegypti eggs were collected from coastal and Western Kenya, hatched in the insectary and reared to F1 generation. Four-day old mosquitoes were exposed to CHIKV through a membrane feeding. They were then incubated in temperatures mimicking the mean annual temperatures for Trans-Nzoia (26 °C) and Lamu (32 °C). After every 7, 10 and 13 days post infection (DPI); one third of exposed mosquitoes were sampled and assayed for virus infection and dissemination. Results The midgut infection rates (MIR) of Ae. aegypti sampled from Coastal Region was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those sampled from Western Kenya, with no statistical differences observed for the coastal Ae. aegypti at EIT 26 and at 32 °C. The MIR of Ae. aegypti from the Western Region was significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the EIT, with mosquito reared at EIT 32 °C exhibiting higher MIR than those reared at EIT 26 °C. There was a significant (p < 0.05) interactive effects of the region, EIT and DPI on MIR. The disseminated infection rates for the CHIKV in Ae. aegypti in the legs (DIR-L) was higher in mosquitoes sampled from Coast regardless of the EIT while those from Western Kenya, dissemination rates were significantly higher at higher EIT of 32 °C. Conclusions Vector competence was higher in mosquito populations reared under high temperatures which weakens the midgut infection barrier. Hence, suggesting Lamu population is more susceptible to CHIKV therefore having a weaker mid gut infection barrier than the Trans Nzoia population. These underscores importance of examining the course of infection at various ambient temperatures and EIT between regions mosquito populations. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.subject Infection rates en_US
dc.subject Dissemination rates en_US
dc.subject Aedes aegypti en_US
dc.subject Chikungunya virus en_US
dc.subject Extrinsic incubation temperature en_US
dc.subject Extrinsic incubation period en_US
dc.title Vector competence of Aedes aegypti in transmitting Chikungunya virus: effects and implications of extrinsic incubation temperature on dissemination and infection rates. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Repository


Browse

My Account